The Idler Wheel… – Fiona Apple | USA / 2012 [EN/FR]

Nowadays, human emotions are used by the music industry as another marketing product, but Fiona Apple has managed to impose a voice of her own which sounds truthful. Through her four albums, she has created a universe where her songs have always sounded believable as though all these situations have personally happened to her – as subversive as they have been – even if they hadn’t. But it clearly has very little importance because she succeeds in making her listeners trust her stories, which is the most remarkable strength in her 2012 release The Idler Wheel Is Wiser than the Driver of the Screw and Whipping Cords Will Serve You More than Ropes Will Ever Do.

It is always really hard to talk about an album that you love because, suddenly, the power of words disappears and they become only tasteless monochromic shapes. Apple’s latest release feels like being Alice and falling into the pit of someone’s wonderland, while the narrator tells you the character’s story by means of metaphors, harmonies and illusions; at the only exception that the tricks are the products of reality. The sound is less polished than some early songs such as ‘Shadowboxer’ and ‘Sleep to Dream’, released on her 1996 debut album Tidal. The howlings from the ghost of Beth Gibbons and the trip-hop-inspired bass lines have been replaced by more intimate and acoustic storytelling.

‘Apple’s voice sounds rough and imperfect, like a lost mind who tries and sings her sorrow, but sometimes just breaks down and gives up on sounding harmonious’

The album takes you on a journey through a wonderful world of emotions, where hopes become shinier and failures more bitter, where pleasures become sweeter and despair harder to forget. The American artist creates a kaleidoscope of graphic moments and involves the listener deeply into her most personal thoughts. It is fascinating to walk around the globe of relationships, rotating with the flick of a finger through lush nature and cities, then ruthless quicksand and deep sea to finally reach the shore where all the emotions, exhausted by so much fighting, slowly weaken, handing over to a relief and possible happiness. The voices then start talking and responding to each other, trying and finding a solution, for example in the incredibly clever ‘Hot Knife’.

There are a lot of begging, false hopes, disillusions, and they are all palpable. Apple’s voice sounds rough and imperfect, like a lost mind who tries and sings her sorrow, but sometimes just breaks down and gives up on sounding harmonious, for example in ‘Jonathan’ but particularly in ‘Regret’.  The lyrics are very self-depreciative and critical, with ideas such as ‘How can I ask anyone to love me/ When all I do is begged to be left alone?’. In every single track of the album, the artist shows a changing and unpredictable mood, which contrasts a lot with the music, impatient, interesting, structured, and taking influences from very different kinds of music.

‘It brings memories of a time where life was a daily game with no consequences, like in ‘Every Single Night’ and its lullaby feeling, but also the easy and comforting denial of reality in ‘Anything We Want’.’

Indeed, from a ragtime that sounds like The Entertainer in ‘Left Alone’, to the very Menomena-esque ‘Jonathan’, to the jazzy ‘Valentine’, the album uses these multiple genres to reinforce this perturbed sensation. This unwanted wander into someone else’s reality gets emphasised by these city noises used for melodies, which suddenly become uncomfortably louder and familiar, especially in ‘Periphery’ and its shoes rubbing on the impersonal gravel. The process of healing from a separation is long, painful, and not in tune with the world. It brings memories of a time where life was a daily game with no consequences, like in ‘Every Single Night’ and its lullaby feeling, but also the easy and comforting denial of reality in ‘Anything We Want’: ‘Let’s pretend we’re eight years old playing hockey’.

Every song is buzzing with great ideas but dissecting every song would miss the point. The album is intense, like a rollercoaster we didn’t expect to be so demanding, but it leaves a sensation of deep satisfaction. Weak and strong, hysterical, sensitive, desperate, endearing, enraged, the only real hope in The Idler Wheel actually happens at the very end of the album. Plunging into her music and impregnating her being into these sounds ends up helping and bringing some light into the picture. I am then going to end this review with the overwhelmingly beautiful ode to friendship and recovery which concludes the album, called ‘Largo’:

‘I feel like singing and drinking and stuff
And I don’t wanna care if I stumble or cry
Handle me like family and that’ll be enough
To keep me from dying when I want to die

When over the rainbow’s too far
Go to Lar, go to Lar, go to Largo
When over the rainbow’s too far
Go to Lar, go to Lar, go to Largo’

***

Two tracks to remember: ‘Hot Knife’ and ‘Largo’

87%

De nos jours, les émotions humaines sont utilisées dans l’industrie de la musique comme un produit marketing comme un autre, mais Fiona Apple a réussi à imposer sa voix véritable. À travers ses quatre albums, elle a créé un univers dans lequel ses chansons ont toujours sonné crédibles, comme si toutes ces situations lui étaient personnellement arrivées – aussi subversives qu’elles aient été – même si ce n’était pas le cas. Mais, clairement, cela n’a pas beaucoup d’importance car elle parvient à nous faire croire aux histoires qu’elle raconte ce qui fait la force de son dernier album en date, sorti en 2012, The Idler Wheel Is Wiser than the Driver of the Screw and Whipping Cords Will Serve You More than Ropes Will Ever Do.

Il est toujours difficile de parler d’un album que l’on a adoré car, soudainement, le pouvoir des mots disparaît pour ne laisser place qu’à des formes monochromes sans saveur. La dernière sortie en date d’Apple nous donne l’impression d’être Alice et de tomber dans le pays des merveilles appartenant à quelqu’un d’autre, tandis que le narrateur raconte l’histoire du personnage au travers de métaphores, harmonies et illusions ; à la seule exception que les tromperies sont produits du réel. Les sonorités sont moins polies que celles entendues dans ses anciennes chansons, telles que ‘Shadowboxer’ ou ‘Sleep to Dream, issues de son premier album Tidal, sorti en 1996. Les accents fantomatiques à la Beth Gibbons et les lignes de basse inspirées du trip-hop ont laissé place à une narration plus intime et acoustique.

‘La voix de Fiona Apple sonne brute et imparfaite, telle une âme perdue qui essaie de chanter son désarroi, mais qui parfois se brise et abandonne ses prétentions harmonieuses.’

L’album est un voyage au cœur d’un fascinant monde d’émotions, où les espoirs deviennent plus brillants et les échecs plus amers, les plaisirs plus doux et les désespoirs plus difficiles à oublier. L’artiste américaine crée un kaléidoscope de moments graphiques et implique l’auditeur dans ses pensées personnelles les plus profondes. Il est fascinant de parcourir ce globe de relations, le faisant tourner d’une pichenette donnant sur une nature et des villes luxuriantes, des impitoyables sables mouvants et des mers profondes pour finalement atteindre le rivage où toutes les émotions, fatiguées par tant de défis, s’affaiblissent lentement, laissant place à un soulagement et un bonheur mérité. Les voices commencent alors à communiquer entre elles, essayant de trouver une solution, par exemple dans l’avant-dernier morceau de l’album ‘Hot Knife’.

Il y a beaucoup d’implorations, de faux espoirs, de désillusions, et ils sont tous palpables. La voix de Fiona Apple sonne brute et imparfaite, telle une âme perdue qui essaie de chanter son désarroi, mais qui parfois se brise et abandonne ses prétentions harmonieuses, par exemple dans ‘Jonathan’ mais surtout dans ‘Regret’. Les paroles sont très autodérisoires et autocritiques, développant des idées telles que ‘How can I ask anyone to love me/ When all I do is begged to be left alone?’ (« Comment puis-je demander à qui que ce soit de m’aimer/ Quand tout ce que je fais est supplier les gens de me laisser tranquille ? »). Dans chaque morceau, l’artiste révèle une humeur changeante et imprévisible, ce qui contraste beaucoup avec la musique, impatiente, intéressante, structurée, et aux influences très variées.

‘Il renvoie à des souvenirs d’un temps où la vie n’était qu’un jeu quotidien sans conséquences, comme dans ‘Every Single Night’ et son atmosphère enfantine, ou le réconfortant déni de réalité dans ‘Anything We Want’.’

En effet, du rag time rappelant le thème du film L’Arnaque présent dans ‘Left Alone’, au piano très Menomena-esque de ‘Jonathan’, jusqu’au accents jazz de ‘Valentine’, l’album utilise ces différents genres pour renforcer cette atmosphère perturbée. Cette ballade indésirable dans la réalité d’une autre est soulignée par ces samples de bruitages citadins utilisés dans les mélodies, qui deviennent soudainement incomfortablement bruyants et familiers. On peut les entendre en particulier dans ‘Periphery’ et ses bruits de chaussures raclant un gravir impersonnel. Le processus de cicatrisation post-séparation est long, douloureux et en désaccord avec ce que l’on peut attendre du monde. Il renvoie à des souvenirs d’un temps où la vie n’était qu’un jeu quotidien sans conséquences, comme dans ‘Every Single Night’ et son atmosphère enfantine, ou le réconfortant déni de réalité dans ‘Anything We Want’ : ‘Let’s pretend we’re eight years old playing hockey’ (« Faisons comme si on avait huit ans et qu’on jouait au hockey »).

Chaque chanson fourmille d’idées formidables mais disséquer chacune d’entre elles serait inutile. L’album est intense, comme une montagne russe que l’on ne pensait pas si exigeante, mais laisse une sensation de profonde satisfaction. Faible et fort, hystérique, sensible, désespéré, attachant, enragé, le seul espoir dans The Idler Wheel apparaît en fait à la toute fin de l’album. Plonger dans sa musique et s’imprégner tout son être de ces sonorités finit par l’aider et redonne de l’espoir à la situation. Je vais donc finir cette critique avec cette magnfique et bouleversante ode à l’amitié concluant l’album, qui s’appelle ‘Largo’ :

‘I feel like singing and drinking and stuff
And I don’t wanna care if I stumble or cry
Handle me like family and that’ll be enough
To keep me from dying when I want to die

When over the rainbow’s too far
Go to Lar, go to Lar, go to Largo
When over the rainbow’s too far
Go to Lar, go to Lar, go to Largo’

***

Deux morceaux à retenir: ‘Hot Knife’ et ‘Largo’

87%

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s